lukegilman.com : The Blawgraphy
Life of a Law Student, University of Houston Law Center

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Please note: I'm no longer updating this particular blog, but keep it around for archival purposes. Visit me at the current blog at www.lukegilman.com

Children and the Law, the Blog

Just a shameless plug and an apology for the light blogging – as part of my work with the Center for Children, Law and Policy at the University of Houston Law Center, we’ve launched a new Children and the Law Blog as part of the center’s mission in promoting interdisciplinary scholarship, advocacy and teaching to advance the interests of children through public policy. Visit often.

Blawg Directory of Lawyer Blogs, Law Professor Blogs and Law Student Blogs

The Christmas break gave me an opportunity to finish up something I’ve been meaning to do for a while. I’m terrible about keeping up with blog rolls and was interested in creating something more comprehensive as a resource for the blawgosphere that would be easy for me to build on later. After a day or two of work I’ve just finished version 1.0 of the Blawg Directory of Lawyer Blogs, Law Professor Blogs and Law Student Blogs. I’ve made a rather confused and pathetic stab at a taxonomy. Overall it’s intended to be a high-level view of the movers and shakers in the blawgosphere, sufficient to give a good leg up to a newbie unfamiliar with the terrain. Take a look. If I’ve made any glaring omissions, please contact me and let me know.

Techies may be interested to know that it’s all run quite simply off the social bookmarking platform del.icio.us using their off-the-shelf linkroll functionality.

How to find out if the Supreme Court granted cert in your case? ScotusBlog

The University of Houston Law Center website had an interesting bit of news last night. The United States Supreme Court granted a writ of certiorari in response to a petition filed by Brent Newton, an Assistant Federal Public Defender who also teaches at the Law Center. This was my favorite part, however -

Prof. Newton said he was surprised when he clicked to a Supreme Court website (http://www.scotusblog.com/) and learned of the court’s decision to grant oral argument in Gonzalez v. United States.

Hold on, the best way to find out the Supreme Court of the United States granted cert in your case from a BLOG? We have entered a braver, newer world ladies and gentlemen.

SCOTUSblog is a tremendous resource and should be on every law students RSS feed. Written by a cadre of Supreme Court appellate specialists, it offers the usual insightful commentary and does a great job of case watching from filing to opinion, with lots of great resources thrown in. Newton’s petition, for instance, is available on SCOTUSblog here.

Scare you to death, Work you to death, Bore you to death

This maxim for the evolution of the law student’s confused meandering toward matriculation is so far all too true in my experience, by which I apologize for the relative lack of posting lately. Technology giveth where law review taketh away however – I’m composing this post on my Crackberry 8800 which I highly recommend.

So Far from Heaven, So Close to Texas – Two Great New Blawgs from New Mexico

Mark Bennett at Defending People turned me on to Issues and Holdings, a blog by New Mexico prosecutor Kirk Chavez, who in turn lead me to Judging Crimes, by Joel Jacobsen, Assistant Attorney General in New Mexico representing the prosecution in appellate courts. Bennett linking to a prosecutor’s blog? Now that’s saying something.

Issues and Holdings focuses on New Mexico law, providing detailed analysis of recent cases and discussion of the issues involved. See California Supreme Court: DNA Reports are not Testimonial, The Sudden Reemergence of State v. Frank; or, The Bell Tolls for Harmless Error in N.M., and To Each Element, A Different Intent.

Judging Crimes takes a more philosophical and measured approach to blogging – one that is thematic, rather than chronological. Combing the archives is well rewarded. See 293. So that its threats may continue to be believed, 292. FY follies, 256. The conservatism of American law schools, and 5. The Constitution’s Rosetta Stone.

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