lukegilman.com : The Blawgraphy
Life of a Law Student, University of Houston Law Center

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Please note: I'm no longer updating this particular blog, but keep it around for archival purposes. Visit me at the current blog at www.lukegilman.com

Glimpse of USNWR Part-Time Program Rankings

Partially previewed here. D.C. anyone?

1. Georgetown (D.C.)
2. George Washington (D.C.)
3. Fordham (N.Y.)
4. American (D.C.)
5. George Mason (Vir.)

Video below:
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End Discrimination Against Wisconsin Law Students, Let the Take the Bar

For years, law students at Marquette and the University of Wisconsin schools of law have suffered a singular indignity. Wisconsin has been alone in subjecting the students from its two law schools to an archaic practice known as the Diploma Privilege, long ago abolished in other, more progressive jurisdictions. So firmly ingrained is the practice in the customs and mindset of the Wisconsin bar that even its victims attempt to defend it. Beverly Moran, The Wisconsin Diploma Privilege: Try It, You’ll Like It, 2000 Wis. L. Rev. 645 (2000).

The insidious operation of the diploma privilege is twofold. First, while not explicitly excluding Wisconsin law students from taking the bar, the Diploma Privilege substantially deprives them of that opportunity by admitting them to practice without it. Second, any Wisconsin graduate who dares to sit for the bar having graduated from those schools is swiftly subjected to shame and ridicule by his peers. Such an attorney is marked with a badge of inferiority, as it is assumed that while smart enough to pass the Wisconsin bar, the attorney was not smart enough to realize he or she didn’t have to take it in the first place.

Fortunately for the downtrodden and oppressed law students of Wisconsin, a young civil rights attorney has agreed to take their case, pro bono. While, as an out of state law student, Christopher Wiesmueller is a member of the privileged class of the Waukesha bar that was actually encouraged to take the bar, his innate sense of moral justice and absolute equality of law students eventually overcame his inherited prejudices. He filed suit on behalf of the disenfranchised who for so long had passed up the BarBri fliers as an unattainable pipe dream. Undaunted by dismissal at the trial level, Wiesmueller recently appeared before the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals, arguing that the rule violates the Constitution’s dormant commerce clause.

Listen to an mp3 of the oral argument below:

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Should he succeed, Wiesmueller’s name will no doubt be shouted from the rooftops in Milwaukee and Madison.

Comparing the Features of the Top 50 Law Review Websites

I’ve compiled a comparison of distinguishing features of the Top 50 Law Review Websites during my tenure as Internet Publishing Editor for the Houston Law Review. When I undertook the position nearly a year ago, my main purpose was simply to see what other legal journals were doing with their websites and to formulate the best practices for my own. As the internet becomes increasingly important to the dissemination of legal research, I thought others might also benefit from a more comprehensive treatment. Hence the spreadsheet. The list was created from the most recent Washington and Lee Journal Rankings. Please feel free to e-mail me with errors or omissions. Also, feel free to reuse the data with my permission for any purpose you wish.

Speech, Privacy, and the Internet: The University and Beyond (University of Chicago)

Chicago Law has made media available from a conference organized by Martha Nussbaum and Cass Sunstein entitled “Speech, Privacy, and the Internet: The University and Beyond.” Video of Lawrence Lessig’s keynote speech appears below:

An aside: Whatever Lessig’s impact on our legal thinking, which is considerable – does he not also deserve a hallowed place in the pantheon of powerpoint presenting? This is another example of clear, lucid, thought-provoking communication equally dependent on the visual and audio elements. Simply powerful – but I digress.

A description of conference appears below:

The current rise in invasive personal gossip, much of it anonymous and much of it directed at students, often by other students, creates an atmosphere that threatens to disrupt the climate of instruction. On the other hand, restrictions on such internet sites raise delicate free speech issues. What challenges do these developments raise on campus, and what direction should universities take to meet these challenges?

Dangers and excesses of Cyber-Gossip

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Anonymity, Information

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Privacy, Gossip, Free Speech

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Gender and Cyber-Insults

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Reputation and Cyberspace

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Legal Heroes: John Marshall Harlan

john-marshall-harlan

The Boston Globe’s Peter S. Canellos has a laudatory piece on the Supreme Court Justice John Marshall Harlan the elder (his son also sat on the Supreme Court) in In 1800s, a rights icon on the bench. The elder Harlan is a hero to me as well, for most of the reasons Canellos cites but also for holding a special place in my heart as an evening student. As I’ve posted previously, for over 20 years Justice Harlan would leave his post at the Supreme Court around 7pm and walk over with another Justice to Columbian University in Washington, D.C. where he taught constitutional Law, domestic relations, commercial law, evidence, torts, and property to the assembled group of law students, most of whom worked as government clerks during the day.

My sense is that the same egalitarian spirit that prompted his famous Plessy dissent, bestowed in Harlan the instinct that there should be no barrier to a legal education for those who possessed the requisite desire, fortitude and potential and that a Supreme Court Justice’s evening was not poorly spent in helping to make that possible.

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